Answered By: hal mendelsohn ucf
Last Updated: Dec 12, 2014     Views: 7

Yes, and it is called the Madrid Protocol.

It is one of two treaties comprising the Madrid System for international registration of trademarks.  The protocol is a filing treaty and not a substantive harmonization treaty.  It provides a cost-effective and efficient way for trademark holders -- individuals and businesses -- to ensure protection for their marks in multiple countries through the filing of one application with a single office, in one language, with one set of fees, in one currency. Moreover, no local agent is needed to file the application.  While an International Registration may be issued, it remains the right of each country or contracting party designated for protection to determine whether or not protection for a mark may be granted.  Once the trademark office in a designated country grants protection, the mark is protected in that country just as if that office had registered it.  The Madrid Protocol also simplifies the subsequent management of the mark, since a simple, single procedural step serves to record subsequent changes in ownership or in the name or address of the holder with World Intellectual Property Organization's International Bureau.  The International Bureau administers the Madrid System and coordinates the transmittal of requests for protection, renewals and other relevant documentation to all members.

For more information, see the Madrid FAQ.

Contact Us

[LibChat Widget goes here.]